The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP)

The Emergency Food Assistance Program is a Federal program that helps supplement the diets of low-income Americans, including elderly people, by providing them with emergency food assistance at no cost. TEFAP is administered at the Federal level by the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), an agency of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

 

The TEFAP Commodities are distributed by the Food Bank of Alaska.

 

Food Bank of Alaska believes that no one deserves to be hungry. Since 1979, we have been securing donated food for nonprofit agencies to distribute to hungry Alaskans.

  

LIHEAP

The Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) helps keep families safe and healthy through initiatives that assist families with energy costs. We provide federally funded assistance in managing costs associated with:

-Home energy bills

-Energy crisis

-Weatherization and energy-related minor home repairs

LIHEAP can help you stay warm in the winter and cool in the summer through programs that reduce the risk of health and safety problems that arise from unsafe heating and cooling practices.

Home Improvement Program

HIP, the Housing Improvement Program, is a home repair, renovation, replacement and new housing grant program administered by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and federally-recognized Indian tribes for American Indians and Alaska Native individuals and families who have no immediate resource for standard housing. While not an entitlement program, HIP was established under The Snyder Act of 1921 as one of several BIA programs authorized by Congress for the benefit of Indian people.

Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA)

ICWA is an integral policy framework on which tribal child welfare programs rely. It provides a structure and requirements for how public and private child welfare agencies and state courts view and conduct their work to serve tribal children and families. It also acknowledges and promotes the role that tribal governments play in supporting tribal families, both on and off tribal lands. However, as is the case with many laws, proper implementation of ICWA requires vigilance, resources, and advocacy.